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Perfect Matzo Brei

Perfect Matzo Brei

Matzo Brei could be my favorite part of Passover. (Notice that the word is “brei” not brie – we’re not talking about French cheese.) Literally “brei” is Yiddish for fried, so the name translates to “fried matzo.”  It is a dish from the Eastern European Jewish tradition that is typically made for breakfast or brunch.  In my house, we consider matzo brei the Passover equivalent of pancakes or French toast; it takes a bit more time to make than you would spend on breakfast for an ordinary weekday morning, but is perfect for a weekend treat.

Basic matzo brei is incredible simple to make and requires only 5 ingredients: matzo, water, eggs, milk, butter or an equivalent (oil or margarine) for frying. 

How to make the perfect matzo brei? That’s simple too. 

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Matzo Granola

Matzo Granola

During Passover, Jews do not eat the grains from which matzo may be made: wheat, barley, oats, rye, and spelt, (collectively called “chametz”) except limited ways that involve making sure they don't rise, nor do we use yeast. In addition, some Jews do not eat rice, seeds or legumes. 

I’m quite fond of granola. So during Passover, when I have to give up my favorite granola for a week, I’m not happy. I can give up pasta, and I’m alright substituting matzo and Passover rolls for bread, but abstaining from my oat-based granola had been a sacrifice, at least up to now.

This year I decided to create a matzo granola that would go well with my morning yogurt during the 7-day observance of Passover. My daughter (visiting for the holiday) pronounced my new recipe a success. Coming into the house just after a batch came out of the oven, she asked what the lovely aroma was. When I answered that I had just made some matzo granola, she grabbed a spoonful to taste, then went back for more to eat as an afternoon snack. This recipe makes 2 pounds, which I’m betting won’t last through the week.

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What's the Deal with Greek Yogurt?

What's the Deal with Greek Yogurt?

Last week I went to the store looking for “regular” plain, nonfat yogurt. Not a particularly unusual grocery item, I figured that there would be several brands to choose from. But that wasn’t the case. There was very little choice among the “regular” yogurts. In their place, I found the shelf crowded with literally dozens of types of Greek and Greek-style yogurts.

The statistics bear out my experience. Since 2008, the share of the U.S. yogurt market occupied by Greek yogurt has gone from 4% to 44%. And that’s big bucks for Greek yogurt makers. Between 2008 and 2013, annual U.S. sales of Greek yogurt skyrocketed from $60 million to $1.5 billion.

This huge increase in the popularity of Greek yogurt made me wonder – what really are the differences between Greek and “regular yogurt? 

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